By Nicole Montesano • Staff Writer • 

Bees and seeds: Roadside vegetation improvements ongoing

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Comments

David S. Wall

I have a few questions concerning Yamhill County's Public Works Director's comments.

From the article;

"County Public Works Director Mark Lago said the state Department of Environmental Quality is now adding another issue to the mix: A requirement that counties control the amount of mercury going into waterways in the Willamette Basin."

What are the sources of Mercury?

Are there any "Legacy Mercury polluters" in Yamhill County? If so, name them.

Mercury pollution in urbanized environments comes from;

1. Construction demolition wastes of old buildings and old appliances containing Mercury thermometers. The Mercury waste, if not properly handled , will end up in the landfill-which is a "point-source-permitted" discharge facility not covered by the DEQ Storm Water management mandate.

2. "Dental amalgam waste" from Dental offices ( a permitted point-source), unless properly sequestered and handled appropriately, ends up in the sanitary sewer system, again; not covered by the DEQ Storm Water management mandate.

3. "Old-style medical use thermometers which are often thrown away-again a land fill (a point-source permitted) discharge facility not covered by the DEQ Storm Water management mandate.

End Post #1
David S. Wall

David S. Wall

From the article:

"Mercury doesn’t go away; it’s constantly here,” Lago said."

O.K. let's justifiably blame Mercury pollutants discharged to the air from "coal-fired" power plants.

From what direction are the prevailing winds being blown over the Willamette Basin? From Oregon or from Asia (China in particular)?

How is the YC-Public Works Department going to characterize and analytically measure the concentration of Mercury?

Is the YC-Public Works Department going to analyze air-samples for Mercury using "air-deposition collection methodologies and laboratory analysis?"

Now to "silt and trash" capture.

From my understanding, the DEQ Storm Water management mandate is to compel local jurisdictions to remove "silt and trash" from entering storm drains (ditches) to prevent this debris from entering the receiving waters.

Again, how is the YC-Public Works Department going to characterize and analytically measure the concentration of Mercury in the "silt and trash" from the roadways?

Is the YC-Public Works Department going to analyze silt samples for Mercury using laboratory analysis to establish background concentrations and additional analyses over time to show the success (or failure) of their Storm Water management program?"

To protect and maintain all storm drain inlets is going to require a stringent and costly Storm Water management program to; reduce, if not eliminate, trash and silt from being discharged into the storm drain collection system; which eventually has an outfall discharge into the receiving waters-unless, cities have "cross-connected collection systems" which shunt storm water and pollutants to the municipalities Waste Water Treatment Plant (a point-source permitted) discharge facility.

End Post #2
David S. Wall

David S. Wall

Post #3

From the article,

"Lago said that he envisions turning ditches into bioswales, clothed in grasses and other plants that slow the flow of water and capture pollutants. It can also help to recharge the water table."

I support the vegetation experiments to attract and sustain pollinators, for I am a "Beekeeper." And, I routinely propagate pollinators to create forage for the Bees.

I have other ideas to facilitate the "seeding issues" to be discussed later.

The bioswales are very good at collecting silt, trash and specific pollutants from entering the receiving waters.

I fully support their generous and varied applications.

If the YC-Public Works Director suggests Mercury is imbedded into the bioswales (in the silt or in the trash" again, this philosophy must be substantiated with verifiable laboratory analysis.

The DEQ Storm Water management mandate for municipalities, to create Storm Water management plans for Yamhill County without mandating proper; sampling and laboratory analyses to establish Mercury concentrations (if at all measureable-the concentrations will probably be in nano-grams or less) in order to protect the receiving waters from Mercury pollution is ...I am at a loss for polite words to describe my opinion on this matter.

From the article: " It can also help to recharge the water table."

This statement depends upon; the volume of water, retention time and percolation rates. Will mosquito habitat be created and or enhanced?

End Post #3
David S. Wall

Lulu

Will this be on the test?