By News-Register staff • 

'Paper airplane guy' visits museum

Marcus Larson/News-Register##
John Collins demonstrates a paper airplane so light and thin that he can keep it spinning in midair indefinitely by forcing air to flow upward with his hands while he walks forward.
Marcus Larson/News-Register## John Collins demonstrates a paper airplane so light and thin that he can keep it spinning in midair indefinitely by forcing air to flow upward with his hands while he walks forward.
Marcus Larson / News-Register##Josh Ramseyer
shows his son Ansel, center, and his friend, Liam Tobin, the next step
in folding their own advanced paper airplanes.
Marcus Larson / News-Register##Josh Ramseyer shows his son Ansel, center, and his friend, Liam Tobin, the next step in folding their own advanced paper airplanes.
Marcus Larson/News-Register##
John Collins demonstrates a paper airplane so light and thin that he can keep it spinning in midair indefinitely by forcing air to flow upward with his hands while he walks forward.
Marcus Larson/News-Register## John Collins demonstrates a paper airplane so light and thin that he can keep it spinning in midair indefinitely by forcing air to flow upward with his hands while he walks forward.
Marcus Larson/News-Register##
Five-year-old Piper Hunter throws her paper airplane as hard as she can while testing its flight characteristics.
Marcus Larson/News-Register## Five-year-old Piper Hunter throws her paper airplane as hard as she can while testing its flight characteristics.

John Collins, known as "The Paper Airplane Guy," thrilled visitors to the Evergreen Aviation Museum Saturday.

Collins always draws a crowd for his annual visits, in which he talks about aerodynamics and folds paper into planes of various types and sizes.

This year, he gave three presentations, one for members and two for the general public.

 

 

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