By Nicole Montesano • Staff Writer • 

Trail meeting draws big crowd

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Comments

yupjoe

Thank Mr. Olson for the meeting. Many opponents did not get to speak until 10pm, and went home before then, because "oops, it looks like we sorted the cards in favor or proponents, except for one farmer who accidentally checked "proponent" ...apologized Mr. Olson halfway through. We the people still do not know how much this trail would cost. The county is in negotiations to purchase twelve (of the seventeen) miles from Union Pacific Railroad for an unknown price, using a 1.8 million ODOT ConnectOregon grant, but that grant is stipulated for engineering and installation of "bridges" to three of the small creeks N of Carlton, for a bicycle path. The grant says nothing about using the money for purchasing property. Nobody asked about this contradiction. Horses will be prohibited on the trail in the city-limits, says federal trail agent Dan Miller, working for the county on this trail proposal, for at least ten years he thinks. Carlton does not want horses in town, they said, at the last Yamhelas Friends Meeting May 24th 2017. And, there will be no trail heads in the country, so horses will have to ride to the trail using the road, unloading somewhere on their own.

yupjoe

On September 6th, 2016 an Oregon Farm Bureau attorney met with Yamhill County planners and its legal counsel to discuss the proposed trail. Present was county attorney Todd Sadlo and planner Ken Friday.

Mr. Sadlo and Mr. Friday indicated that there were no plans for a bicycle path, and that the county was only purchasing property for a future commuter-line to Washington County. This contradicted the six recent Yamhelas Friend's public trail events in which county officials and employees had spoken at length about a proposed trail, and announced ODOT grant money specifically allocated for the Yamhelas Westsider bike path.

We would like to point out that Benton County tried a similar endeavor but could not fulfill farm-mitigation requirements and had to give their ODOT grant-money back.

If a bike path is being considered, the law requires the ORS 915.296 process to be complete. -a partial quote from written testimony submitted at the June 8th meeting.

Shasta

After attending this meeting, its clear that there is overwhelming support for it. I also find it laughable that a few of the richest farmers in the county that showed up at the meeting opposed to the trail are making the argument that its going to somehow hurt their wallets drastically if this trail goes in. Does Mr.Kuehne from Dayton even farm land adjacent to the trail?. Does Tom Hammer from Wheatland (south end of the county)farm land adjacent to the trail? And, I find it odd that he also lets himself dictate who is a "real" farmer and who isn't. And why that would even matter? I would think from that perspective the smaller farmer would be affected more so than the larger.
As far as the opponents signs go, they seem to have raised more attention in a positive way than actually swaying people into opposition. At least that's the feedback I've received from numerous people, some local, some tourists. "why would anyone be opposed to a walking trail"?

Nvs

Shasta I believe Mr. Hammer's point of concern is fiscal responsibility for the tax payer expenditures. You heard the commissioner's admit they had no idea what the trail will cost and income from outside sources will be drying up in the near future while cost and obligations are increasing. A valid concern for the next generation of residents. Mr. Kuehne does in fact farm along the proposed trail corridor and will be impacted by it as will I. Shasta do you own land and farm along the trail? You infer that Mr. Hammer and Mr. Kuehne might not farm along the rail but I would like to point out a fact that Mr.Wright does not farm along the trail and his farming operation will not be impacted by the trail. I would like to support a bike path on Mr. Wright's vineyards, it would be scenic and not impact any farming activities according to Mr. Wright. Mr. Wright could lead by example and show the farming community that there are no impacts and their concerns are just that, concerns. It would be a win win, Mr. Wright gets his trail and the community has a place to bike and recreate.

yupjoe

I thought the paper got it backwards about Mr. Hammer's comments. I am a supper-small farmer, and I am more opposed to this then anybody. This will shut me out of my cattle and dairy project, so unless I can find another place to rent that is close, I am done. Its on both sides of the tracks. On another rented parcel, it will greatly hamper my filbert operation which is very very small, but right up to the tracks.

yupjoe

Yes, Mr. Keuhne does own property along the tracks, how else do you think he got on my mailing list?

yupjoe

Keep in mind that Yamhill County Farm Bureau was there, and they have a large membership of families. Their stance in their letter submitted is that whether this light-rail project is really going to be a bike-path first or not, that the legally-required land-use process be followed.

Jim

I feel a point a lot of people are missing is the privacy living in the country affords you. The railroad has been gone for years and people have gotten used to the peace they have had. If people from town want to walk,bike,or ride a horse we have national forest,parks and many avenues to do what you want outside the city. If I lived along the tracks I would be more upset than yupjoe. I pay for my country living and enjoy my privacy and don't expect the government to pay for it.

Nvs

Jim. Thank you for a common sense view that understands the huge reduction in the quality of life for the people that live along the proposed trail. So far all the supporters live somewhere else and all the opponents live along the corridor.

tagup

Jim, I get your point, but from a purely factual point of view, you didn't pay for the right of way.... Yupjoe seems to have the same issue...wanting to have free access across the right of way that he doesn't own, while banning all others from it's use.
I would think there are many ways to retain your privacy through landscaping and fencing while accommodating a trail intended for public use. I think both can co exist.

Jim

Tagup the railroad still owns most of the proposed trail sight. But when and if the county buys it we all get to pay for it. My vote would be for taking those funds and fixing our pothole filled roads and educating our kids before building something that only fits a small group of people instead of the entire community.

tagup

Jim, I can understand that point completely, but we must at least acknowledge the economic benefits that the trail might bring. The spending of tax dollars will always be a matter of debate as to what the priorities should be.....but there is also a case to be made for developing projects for the future.

Jim

Tagup I understand investing in the future of our county. The economic benefits you speak of will again only help a small group of people. The people of Willamina,Amity,Newberg,Dayton and Sheridan are all in this county and will pay for and help maintain this proposed trail but will they benefit economically from this? I doubt it. I think in a state that is in turmoil finically we need to be very wise with our dollars.

Nvs

Tagup can you provide some documentation of some new businesses that are just waiting to open as soon as the trail is put in or will there be some part time jobs serving bottled water and ice cream in Carlton? The bike club touts this huge economic surge that will come to the county but not one bit of proof that it will happen. Just speculation. The trail isn't connecting to Gaston so PDXer's will drive by Gaston and Yamhill to try and park in Carlton. Maybe some new hotels, an Outback steak house in Carlton? Anything?

tagup

Common sense would dictate that if more people that are attracted to the area the result would be more revenue for local business.....clearly your obvious bias in the discussion keeps you from admitting the obvious....

Nvs

Yep I call it speculation and you call it fact. Show me some facts and dispel my bias and pettiness. Facts talk and nobody has shown me any facts just speculation. Prove me wrong!

tagup

Sure.....as soon as you show me "facts" that there will be an increase in crime or garbage or trespassing or reduced privacy.....Of course you can't because facts aren't available for either side since the trail doesn't exist......using your logic no project anywhere could get done...but again, your bias requires an unattainable standard of proof to move forward.

Nvs

This website will give you lots of stuff to disparage and say it won't happen here and made up info. There are over 600 pages of data. National Association of Reversionary Property Owners

http://home.earthlink.net/~dick156/

tagup

I have chosen to keep an open mind about the trail project and have no desire to disparage either side or their data....both factions have valid concerns that could be overcome with compromise. IMO.

yupjoe

Those whose property is on both sides have what is called a permanent easement to cross, and so parked train-cars had to be broken there too.

As for crime facts, this will be better then Springwater, but worse then Banks-Vernonia, given that its "rural-ness" is between them. Banks-Vernonia was very busy the first two years, and crime was low, but then the use dropped way down and the Sheriff's department gets a few more calls out there I was told. Those are a matter of public record. I have pulled them. Mostly its walkers who can't find their dog, a few disoriented people acting strange, and someone calls them in, a few broken-car windows, and four-wheeler traffic that people call in. There are farms at the first few miles on the E end, and one was a dairy that has since sold or closed. It had land on both sides, so there had to be an opening to cross the bike-path, and that was where the trouble came in, steeling tractor batteries, cutting up and stealing aluminum irrigation pipe for the metal, and one time he and his grandson went out to change the irrigation to the next set, and there was a patch in his field all smashed down, like a deer has laid there, but it was not deer, it was a naked lady, in his crop, alive. These are facts, and one loose bull that the Sherriff had to help capture. Usually you shoot bulls when they get out, but this one was nice enough to not gore any of the walkers. That is on the 911 report.

yupjoe

Thank you KLYC for putting this on YouTube and Mr. Olson who broke the tie to hold a meeting.
https://youtu.be/AyBiq-aILfU?t=6183

yupjoe

Youtube: Thank you KLYC for putting this meeting up for the public to view on video!
https://youtu.be/AyBiq-aILfU?t=6183

Lulu

Could everyone please stop using that annoying, pretentious term "best practices"? Stupid vacuous business jargon simply serves to obscure all issues and is about as disingenuous as "transparency."

Sal Peralta

NVS - Personally, I don't need an economic argument for putting in a recreational bike path. We invest in recreational infrastructure because it is good for the people who live here. It would be nice to have a safe biking trail from Yamhill to Carlton and beyond. Maybe eventually connecting Dayton to Hagg Lake. However, if you need economic arguments for the benefits of adding recreational infrastructure, it has actually been pretty well researched that these kinds of trails increase property values and economic activitity. Anecdotally, you can go to Vernonia and ask the shop-keepers whether the trail is a net plus. Here's some data on how they affect property values and economic activity. http://headwaterseconomics.org/wp-content/uploads/trails-library-property-value-overview.pdf http://www.stantec.com/blog/2016/show-me-the-money-why-complete-streets-make-economic-sense.html#.WULm9-vyuUl

Nvs

Sal. How much should we invest? $1,000,000, $100,000,000 does it matter since it's "free" money. How man of those jobs in Vernonia are full time year around, family wage jobs that provide insurance and retirement vs. service type jobs that minimum wage jobs dependent on tips? Vernonia looks pretty slow to me when I drive through there in the winter. I didn't even see the hot dog cart the one bike guy was so excited about at the town hall meeting, but it sure sounds good.
There just as many studies by "experts" that say property values decrease and business doesn't explode like the opponents try to sell. Only time will tell. At least 100% of Yamhill county residents will pay for the benefit of less than 1% of the residents that will use the trail. I call dibs on opening the first armoured car company in Carlton!

yupjoe

The way I see, true economic Prowess begins in the womb- with "mother" earth- soil... which is where we find iron-ore, timber, farming.... what this town of Carlton (big then) was like in the 1920's after the "Forgotten Depression of 1920" because the federal government did nothing to "fix" it, Carlton had a four-story hotel, hospital, a grocery store branded "Safeway", a camp for the logging mill, and numerous little workshops to support the great big lumber industry here, the one that got killed by the bard owl that killed the spotted owl, but got blamed on the loggers by the EPA. Vernonia shares in this history. Its true that now in the summer the bike path in Vernonia has given its nearby campgrounds life, which spills into Vernonia on sunny warms days, the few they get there, but that is just Busy-ness and leisure, not economic Prowess. Economic Prowess is what enabled The United States to beat back Nazism, Communism, and many other isms. Prowess Sal. Not ice cream. Although I like both very much. How's that for recreation and health- become a logger.

tagup

I don't mean to nit-pick, but didn't the LHL Mill in Carlton close in the 60's?.....I thought the spotted Owl stuff was in the 80's?..........

Joel2828

Great post Lulu!! Glad I'm not the only one.

yupjoe

Wright grows about 220 acres of grapes, and none of them are along the proposed bike-path. His winery and (rumored) future hotel are. He has the old depot in Carlton. I am surprised that other winery organizations have not made much effort to favor this bike-path proposal. Reference: "Wright, who farms 220 acres himself, and depends on raising and processing crops for his livelihood, said he isn’t eager to have restrictions imposed on his farming practices either. But he said the trail would not do so."

Culbert

To update yupjoe's comeents, the County has actually received two grants, one for trail acquisition, and another one for the design and engineering of three bridges. What portion of the trail that will actually be acquired depends on the final price agreed to between the county and Union Pacific. It is hoped that the aquisition grant funds will cover 12 of the 17 miles of the available abandoned rail ROW.

Lulu

Capital location to be mugged in the restrooms.

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