Rockne Roll/News-Register##A  Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office patrol car is wedged under a transmission tower on the Christensen Auto Sales lot following Wednesday morning’s fatal officer-involved shooting.
Rockne Roll/News-Register##A Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office patrol car is wedged under a transmission tower on the Christensen Auto Sales lot following Wednesday morning’s fatal officer-involved shooting.
Rockne Roll/News-Register##Law enforcement team, led by Yamhill County District Attorney Brad Berry, far right, investigate officer-involved shooting.
Rockne Roll/News-Register##Law enforcement team, led by Yamhill County District Attorney Brad Berry, far right, investigate officer-involved shooting.
By News-Register staff • 

Sheriff's deputy shoots, kills Dayton man

[UPDATED: Friday, July 3, with version as it appears in today's newspaper.] 

Convicted felon Kevin Lamont Judson, 24, of Dayton, was shot and killed about 7:30 a.m. Wednesday by Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office deputy Richard Broyles, a 16-year veteran of the agency.

An autopsy performed Thursday by Dr. Christopher Youngat of the state Medical Examiner’s Office in Clackamas determined Judson died of two gunshot wounds.

##Kevin Lamont Judson, 24, of Dayton, poses in a photo on his personal Facebook page.

Broyles has been placed on paid administrative leave, pending the outcome of the Major Crime Response Team’s investigation being led by District Attorney Brad Berry. That’s standard procedure in police-involved shooting cases.

Berry gave this account of the events leading up to the shooting:

About 7:30 a.m., a sheriff’s deputy conducted a traffic stop on Northeast Doran Drive, just off Highway 99W. During the stop, the deputy requested backup.

Neither Berry nor Sheriff Tim Svenson would identify the deputy, who Svenson said was being given time off to deal with the emotional side of what transpired.

“That deputy is feeling somewhat responsible,” Svenson said. “It was his traffic stop.”

A cover unit was asked to respond “Code 1,” according to Yamhill Communications Agency radio traffic. That’s a non-emergency response.

While the cover unit was still en route, the backseat passenger in the car that had been stopped, identified as Judson, fled across the highway into a parking lot shared by Christensen Auto Sales and the Tire Factory. Two other occupants, the driver and a second passenger, remained at the scene under the watch of the deputy who initiated the stop.

Berry did not identify either individual. Svenson said he did not have their names.

Officers discovered a meth pipe in the course of the stop, but no one was charged or taken into custody at the scene.

When Broyles arrived as backup, he encountered Judson in the parking lot on the other side of the highway. Although details have not yet been fully sorted out and released, officials indicated Broyles and Judson got into a struggle that eventually led to Broyles pulling a gun and firing.

At the time he was shot, Judson was alone in the driver’s seat of Broyles’ patrol vehicle. Asked if Judson had armed or attempted to arm himself, Berry said, “I don’t have that information.”

“Interviews are still being done with witnesses,” Berry said. “I’m not in a position at this time to state factually the sequence of events, and I won’t be until the investigation is completed.”

At the time of the shooting, Broyles and Judson were the only two present. However, some bystanders were present and they are cooperating with the investigation and providing statements, Berry said.

Berry met Thursday morning with lead investigators from the McMinnville Police Department. They engaged in discussion related to their schedule of interviews for the remainder of the day.

Additional interviews were scheduled today.

“Yamhill County has a real good group of investigators,” Svenson said, referencing members of the county’s Major Crime Response Team. “They are highly competent, highly qualified.

“They do a standup job. In my opinion, they can be matched up with any investigative group in the state of Oregon.”

Svenson said law enforcement officers train for incidents like the one that unfolded Wednesday, but hope they never happen. “It’s something that, none of us go to work and hope an event like this comes our way,” he said.

Svenson said he had been conversing with the deputies who were involved in the case just minutes before the incident began to unfold. “Just like it was any other day,” he said.

“That just goes to show you how quickly you can go from a normal day, having a normal everyday conversation, to one where you’re having to think quickly on your feet, and it ends up in a deadly force situation, five minutes after you’ve had a casual conversation with your people.”

Judson, listed by McMinnville police as a “Wanted Person” on a charge of failure to appear, had been convicted in March 2011 of one count of possession of a controlled substance/methamphetamine, a Class C felony. He was sentenced to 18 months probation.

He was arrested on the charge in November 2010. He was granted a conditional release from jail pending trial, according to court records.

He entered the county’s Drug Court Program. Court records indicate he participated in the program on a continual basis, though he was sanctioned several times along the way for unspecified reasons.

In December 2011, he was arraigned on a probation violation. He denied the allegation initially, but later admitted it, leading to revocation of his probation and his expulsion from the Drug Court Program.

His sentence on the violation was a $245 fine, which was ultimately converted to 31 hours of community service.

He was sanctioned several times after that for violating his probation. Repeated violations led to revocation of his probation in 2012, and he was sentenced to 60 days in prison, the time to be served in the county jail rather than a state facility.

His record also reflects a pair of restraining order violations.

Anyone with potentially useful information is asked to call the McMinnville police tip line at 503-434-2337.

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

[UPDATE: 4:15 p.m.] The McMinnville Police Department has identified the man shot this morning by a sheriff's deputy as Kevin Lamont Judson, 24, of Dayton, and the involved deputy as Deputy Richard Broyles, a 16-year veteran of the sheriff's office.

"(Broyles) was unharmed and is currently on paid administrative leave as per established protocol," according to an MPD press release.

No further details of the incident have been released.

----

A Yamhill County sheriff's deputy shot and killed an adult male suspect about 7:30 a.m. Wednesday near the intersection of North Highway 99W and Doran Drive in McMinnville.

Neither the suspect nor the deputy, who wasn't injured, have been identified.

Immediately following the shooting, a heavy concentration of law enforcement officers from multiple agencies  converged on the Christensen Auto Sales lot at 3080 N.E. Highway 99W, between the Tire Factory and Blue Star Gas.

The incident began when an officer made contact with a motorist at Highway 99W and Doran Drive, across from Christensen Auto Sales, according to Yamhill Communications Agency radio traffic.

An occupant of the vehicle reportedly fled on foot. Two others remained behind.

A methamphetamine pipe was reportedly dropped on the ground by one of the subjects.

Moments later, a "shots fired" report was transmitted.

At the site, a sheriff's office patrol car could be seen wedged under a transmission tower on the auto sales lot. The scene was deemed "secured" about 7:50.

The Major Crime Response Team, overseen by District Attorney Brad Berry, assembled to investigate the incident. Law enforcement vehicles lined Highway 99W as the investigation got underway.

Anyone with information is asked to contact McMinnville police at 503-434-2337.

Additional information will be posted as it becomes available, officials said.

 

Comments

TTT

I want to say thank you to the Yamhill County Sheriff's Office for your service.

listen*up

Good job Officer Broyles,you did what you had to do,RIP mr.judson the drugs took your life a long time ago,today your body and lost soul were reunited.

myopinion

listen*up - VERY well put. I knew the boy, he was a good kid, I know, the cliche sentence when something like this happens. but he really was. then the drugs took over, sadly. I'm sorry the officer was put in this situation. No one wins.

Sandy

Two police shootings in Mac in less than a year after 40 years without? Are police now being taught to shoot first and ask questions later? Yes, both were people who had broken the law., one had murdered. But shooting should be the last response, not the first. There have been twenty police shootings in the U.S since July 1, more than most countries have in a year. This needs to stop.

sbagwell

There has still been only one police shooting in at least 40 years involving a McMinnville police officer, and as far as anyone can recall, ever. During that period, there have been at least four involving sheriff's deputies, two of them occurring in McMinnville and two out in the hinterlands. There was also a local shooting involving a state trooper. I'm basing that on memory, but am pretty confident I have it right.
Steve

listen*up

the police are doing their job!if it means shooting a scumbag that endangers the officers life or a threat to the community then you stop the threat!Obey the laws,Obey police commands and you don't have anything to worry about,act stupid and it could be your last act.

listen*up

the police are doing their job!if it means shooting a scumbag that endangers the officers life or a threat to the community then you stop the threat!Obey the laws,Obey police commands and you don't have anything to worry about,act stupid and it could be your last act.

tagup

"obey the laws, obey police commands and you have nothing to worry about".....from your experience that may be true, but from the perspective of the minority community,there is plenty to worry about from the police. Portland PD is a pretty good example of my point.

kona

tagup, there should be "plenty to worry about" if any person doesn't "obey the laws, obey police commands".

tagup

Evidence is abundant that illustrates racial bias in how police do business. Not so much in this case, but generally, there is plenty of reason for miniority citizens to fear police even when they haven't broken the law. I wonder how you might feel about being routinely pulled over and interegated for no other reason than your looks or being perceived to be in the wrong area of town?

kona

tagup, unfortunately there is a direct correlation between economic status and deviant behavior. Minorities are in the lower economic levels (generally) and there is significantly more deviant behavior. With that comes increased contact with law enforcement. Obeying the law and listening to police commands are extremely important and should be taught to everyone at a young age. There shouldn't be any fear involved.

tagup

So is crime the driving force for additional police contact or is the additional police contact creating the data?

I think we both know that profiling occurs, it's pretty clear that fear of the authorities will continue until minorities feel that the police can be trusted and are there to protect and serve them as well.

kona

You asked, "So is crime the driving force for additional police contact or is the additional police contact creating the data?"

It is both. Additional crime produces additional contact which produces additional data.

Profiling does occur. It is a product of additional crimes being committed by different segments of society in different living areas. Profiling will occur until all segments of society are equal in crime. That will probably never happen. But, there should never be a "fear" of the police. It starts with " "obey(ing) the laws, obey(ing) police commands". That simple.

tagup

When "obey(ing)" the law results in police scrutiny regardless, and "obey(ing) an officer results in search, handcuffing and arrest without having broken the law, then fear will continue to exist and rightly so. Certainly you recognize that the white community is handled much differently than the minority community when it comes to law enforcement. That difference in treatment is where the fear originates.

kona

You said, "When "obey(ing)" the law results in police scrutiny regardless, and "obey(ing) an officer results in search, handcuffing and arrest without having broken the law, then fear will continue to exist and rightly so."

If that were the case, then I would agree with you. I will not buy your "straw man" situation as being universally correct. It might happen in a very small percentage of situations, but I won't agree that police go around looking for minorities to "search, handcuff and arrest without having broken the law". That is paranoid and not backed up by fact except in very isolated situations. People of all color are sometimes wrongfully searched, handcuffed and arrested, but almost always with cause. I would expect that people of any color who don't "obey the laws and/or obey police commands" will fear contact with the police.

As I said previously, "unfortunately there is a direct correlation between economic status and deviant behavior. Minorities (the exception being Asians) are in the lower economic levels (generally) and there is significantly more deviant behavior. With that comes increased contact with law enforcement."

kona

You said, " Certainly you recognize that the white community is handled much differently than the minority community when it comes to law enforcement".

I will not concede that your comment is based solely on skin color. Are Asians unfairly treated by police? Does this have more to do with deviant behavior than is does being a "minority"? Does level of education influence deviant behavior? Does education influence contact with police? There is so much more involved than just the color of skin.

tagup

You stated previously that there shouldn't be fear involved when obeying commands from law inforcement ....the fact of the matter is in the minority communities there is. We can argue the cause from here to eternity but that fear of police is real and it dictates how people react. In my demographic I don't have fear, because I'm not a minority, but I have seen first hand (in this county ) actions that were taken against minorities by police that never would have been taken towards me or people of my demographic.

kona

I won't disagree that some people (regardless of skin color) fear contact with the police. I have that same feeling when I am driving 10 mph over the speed limit and the police car pulls out behind me. At that point (if he/she is actually pursuing me) I will do exactly as dictated by the policeman. If his lights go on I will pull over and do exactly as he says. It is "stupid" to not do as the police say, but many will be arrogant and escalate the situation.

But your blanket statement that minorities fear police is an over-reach. Some do and some don't. It is those (of all races) on the edge of illegal activity who do (and should) fear the police. If there is fear of the police among some minorities then they need to be law abiding and get some education about dealing with the police. In other words, don't run or do anything to escalate an involvement. Some of these people need to temper their attitude.

tagup

I think you minimize the scope of the problem. It's not the same feeling when a cop pulls up behind you. You might worry about a speeding ticket...minorities worry about being arrested, beaten or worse. Something you might think is stupid, (i.e. running from police) might be seen as self preservation in another circumstance. It's easy to say what people "should" do, but if you don't live with police bias, the violence and the cultural perceptions, I don't think you can truly appreciate the reasoning.
For you and me...... sure do what the officer says and things will be fine....but our world is not universal.
Thanks for the discussion......

kona

You said, "do what the officer says and things will be fine".

You are correct. If someone does differently things are not fine. It is that simple. That is why we have laws. Everyone living in the U.S. should understand that. If not it is lack of education. Innocent people with a decent attitude very seldom have problems with police. Naturally the exceptions get greatly publicized, but they are very rare exceptions.

In McMinnville and Yamhill County there are very few problems with the police force, especially for law abiding citizens. We want the police to cause problems for those who are not law abiding, regardless of skin color. Are you suggesting that the police have it in for Blacks and Hispanics who are law abiding? How about Asians?

tagup

The Eric Garner case is the one that is in the news lately..given the facts of this case, fear of police might be a logical conclusion. The guy ended up dying at the hands of the police over an accusation of selling single loose cigarettes.... You state that there are "very few" problems in our county for law abiding citizens...Not sure you know all the issues that might take place, especially within the minority communities.. Police have a broad authority to determine who is "law abiding". Would you expect to be taken into custody for selling loose cigarettes?.

kona

1) "Convicted felon Kevin Lamont Judson, 24, of Dayton,"

2) "While the cover unit was still en route, the backseat passenger in the car that had been stopped, identified as Judson, fled across the highway into a parking lot"

3) "Two other occupants, the driver and a second passenger, remained at the scene under the watch of the deputy who initiated the stop."

4) "officials indicated Broyles and Judson got into a struggle that eventually led to Broyles pulling a gun and firing"

5) "At the time he was shot, Judson was alone in the driver’s seat of Broyles’ patrol vehicle."

6) "Judson, listed by McMinnville police as a “Wanted Person” on a charge of failure to appear, had been convicted in March 2011 of one count of possession of a controlled substance/methamphetamine, a Class C felony. He was sentenced to 18 months probation."

7) "In December 2011, he was arraigned on a probation violation. He denied the allegation initially, but later admitted it, leading to revocation of his probation and his expulsion from the Drug Court Program."

8) "He was sanctioned several times after that for violating his probation. Repeated violations led to revocation of his probation in 2012, and he was sentenced to 60 days in prison, the time to be served in the county jail rather than a state facility."

9) "His record also reflects a pair of restraining order violations."

People on the fringe of the law should fear the police. It is the result of their own decisions/actions, and not police intimidation. I don't know how much clearer it needs for you to understand (as I previously stated), It starts with "obey(ing) the laws, obey(ing) police commands". That simple."

tagup

My point was not to argue the Judson case, my point was to illustrate that in many places fear of police (by people that have not broken the law) exists. It exists because of unfair and unequal treatment by the law enforecment system. For you, obeying all police commands makes sense based on your experience with law enforcement. Not everyone has had the same experience....for them it's not "that simple". Do you not realize how cases like the Eric Garner's can influence how minorities perceive law enforcemnt?

Dog Lover

So, when "white" becomes the "minority" population - will the "minority" card no longer be used?

Lulu

Why don't we ask McMinnville police officer Tim Heidt? If you recall, he severely beat a passenger from a vehicle he had pulled over.

kona

Garner, 43, had history of more than 30 arrests dating back to 1980, on charges including assault and grand larceny. People like him cause problems for anyone who might fear the police.

It starts with "obey(ing) the laws, obey(ing) police commands". That simple."

Web Design & Web Development by LVSYS