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Many 'usual suspects' make N-R's Top 10 list

Jan 3, 2014 | 1 Comment


By The News-Register Editorial Board

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Comments

07:35 am - Fri, January 10 2014
Don Dix said:
The articles states --"One predictable subject for a Top 10 spot is the unpredictability of the weather. This is the sixth time in the past 10 years that a weather phenomenon made the News-Register’s Top 10."

Weather unpredictable? Really! If that be true (which it is), why do some people become enthralled with dire predictions of rising temperatures because humans (supposedly) are heating up the planet?

Ask yourself, how close to actual are the daily predictions made by forecasters? Sometimes accurate, sometimes not even close. Go a couple days in advance, and the correct ratio falls steeply.

Last year, a meteorologist complained that people were paying to much attention to the predictions made by a groundhog's activities. He explained that the groundhog had only a 37% correct ratio, so those predictions were quite faulty. But when asked, the man literally boasted that the human weather predictions 'rose' to the 38% correct category. Yet 1% less is faulty?

So, if using similar weather models to predict daily weather can only be around 40% correct, how does one put much faith in the predictions made for 30, 40, or 100 years from now? Not the wisest choice.

All the scientists with impressive credentials that study weather can make all the predictions they wish, but one big belch ( or lack of one ) from the Sun changes everything. Historical change of climate, temperatures, and life forms has a direct correlation to activities of the Sun -- and the scientists blame humans -- it's the only factor they can actual chase (and possibly control).



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