By Starla Pointer • Staff Writer • 

Carlton police will pedal patrols

Starla Pointer / News-Register##With help from Officer Tim Jordan, 6-year-old Tanner Rauch checks out one of the Carlton police department s new patrol bicycles. Officers will be able to interact with kids more on the bikes, they said.
Starla Pointer / News-Register##With help from Officer Tim Jordan, 6-year-old Tanner Rauch checks out one of the Carlton police department's new patrol bicycles. Officers will be able to interact with kids more on the bikes, they said.

CARLTON — Police have two new patrol vehicles, painted shiny black with gold lettering and trim and equipped with lights and sirens, just like the rest of the fleet.

They don’t run on gas, however. These patrol bicycles depend on pedal power.

Officers Jake Blair and Tim Jordan displayed the new bikes Friday in Ladd Park, the upper city park. They distributed popsicles and water to passersby as they told them about bicycle patrols.

The officers and Chief Kevin Martinez often stop and chat with Carlton youngsters and adults when patrolling in their cars. The bikes will allow them to be more accessible and help start friendly conversations.

“Bikes get us out of the car and lets us go places like the parks to see kids,” Jordan said. “We’re more approachable.”

Blair, who paroled on a bike when he worked for the Linfield College Public Safety Department, added, “It’s a whole different dynamic. We see more and hear more.”

Martinez said he and his officers always want more interaction with the community. They build relationships by hosting the National Night Out event on the first Tuesday in August, by delivering Christmas teddy bears and through other activities.

The department’s motto, printed on its patrol cars, is “Police and Community Together.”

His department received a $3,700 grant from the Cycle Oregon Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation with which to start the bike patrol program. Tommy’s Bicycle Shop in McMinnville helped as well, putting the bikes together and attaching all the equipment.

In addition to the bikes themselves, the grant provided uniforms for officers to wear while on two-wheeled patrol. The outfits include bright yellow tops for increased visibility.

The officers wear bike helmets, as well. Not only do the helmets provide protection, they also set a positive example for youngsters, Carlton police said.

“We always wear our helmets,” Jordan told children gathered in the park, then asked them, “Do you?”

Comments

Mac Native 66

That's funny, they don't drive their cars, so why would they ride their bikes. Every time I've driven through town, I see the cars parked by First Fed or the old solder house. I'd like to see them case a car out to Westside Rd. or Merchant Rd. on the bike.

tagup

I think Carlton's strategic parking of Police cars is genius. Having the unoccupied vehicles parked in visible locations is a great reminder for drivers to slow down.....As opposed to another local town where the police hide, out of sight and write tickets.....If the goal is to actually change the driving habits in an area and make it safer, visibility is the key....If the goal is revenue from tickets then probably not....

Mac Native 66

Only you would come up with a statement like that tagup. If the police force had been removed and the Sheriff Dept. had taken over, they would be driving like real law enforcement.

tagup

It seems it must be more than me that thinks the decoy technique is useful as they have been using it for a number of years.....Obviously you noticed, so it appears to be effective...

Mudstump

I agree with you tagup....the decoys works for me. At the very least it is a reminder to check my speed. I think it's a good idea for police to mingle with the community and riding a bike makes them accessible.

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