By Starla Pointer • Staff Writer • 

Look on the bright side ... or not

Marcus Larson/News-RegisterG-Man (Cesar Anguiano) confronts Ed (Seth Renne) with evidence of his plans to blow up government property, in “You Can’t Take It With You,” opening Friday.
Marcus Larson/News-Register
G-Man (Cesar Anguiano) confronts Ed (Seth Renne) with evidence of his plans to blow up government property, in “You Can’t Take It With You,” opening Friday.
Marcus Larson/News-RegisterMarcus Larson/News-Register
Tony (Seth Mayhew) talks with Alice (Bethany Mason) about their families, who are about to meet.
Marcus Larson/News-Register
Marcus Larson/News-Register Tony (Seth Mayhew) talks with Alice (Bethany Mason) about their families, who are about to meet.
Marcus Larson/News-RegisterPenny (Kari Trickey) chats with Ed (Seth Renne) while Mr. Kirby (Philip Van Cleave), Grampa (Dave Davis), and Mrs. Kirby (Meridith Symons) listen. The cast of 16 includes several actors with double roles. “They’re doing a great job,” director Paula Terry said.
Marcus Larson/News-Register
Penny (Kari Trickey) chats with Ed (Seth Renne) while Mr. Kirby (Philip Van Cleave), Grampa (Dave Davis), and Mrs. Kirby (Meridith Symons) listen. The cast of 16 includes several actors with double roles. “They’re doing a great job,” director Paula Terry said.

“You Can’t Take It With You” will play through Nov. 8 in Gallery’s Arena Theater, Second and Ford streets in downtown McMinnville. Curtain is at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays.

Tickets are $14 for adults and $12 for students and seniors. Tickets for the first Saturday, Oct. 18 only, will be sold on a buy-one, get-one-free basis.

Paula Terry is directing Gallery’s version of the show, which was written by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. She said she’s keeping it pretty much the same as it was when it first opened in 1937.

However, she said, the 2014 cast had to make a few changes. They cut a couple of references that are no longer politically correct or meaningful to a modern audience, for instance.

They kept references to institutions such as the WPA, however, giving younger cast members a chance to learn about the Works Progress Administration, Roosevelt’s New Deal and other aspects of the Great Depression.

In the play, the Sycamore family, like everyone else, feels the impact of the Great Depression. But family members look on the bright side.

The Kirbys do not. And when the Kirbys’ son, Tony, falls for the Sycamores’ daughter, Alice, things get interesting. The Kirby parents are shocked by what they find when they visit the Sycamore home.

“I love the show,” said Terry, who performed in a production of the play years ago. “It’s the definition of ‘look on the bright side.’ There’s always a bright side!”

She said she wants audiences to enjoy the “laugh out loud” show. And she wants them to take home the message about choosing happiness: “It’s important. It makes you live longer. Being happy with simple things, with what you have, is a virtue.”

Terry said the cast includes about 16 people, several with double roles.

“I’m very proud of the cast. They’re doing a great job,” she said.

The cast includes Cesar Anguiano, Christian Anguiano, Eric Armstrong, Leslie Collins, Rolan Cranford, Dave Davis, Kevin Hamler-Dupras, Ethan Keleher, Bethany Mason, Seth Mayhew, Toby O’Brien, Seth Renne, Caroline Smith, Meridith Symons, Kari Tricky, and Phillip Van Cleave.

Terry created the set, which represents the front room of the Sycamore house.

Antonia Osterhout is in charge of costumes, with assistance from Stephanie Belt-Verhoef.

Sami Whitmore is assisting Robert Osterhout with lights.

Renne is assistant director, as well as a cast member. Glenn Eager is the sound operator.

For more information and reservations, call the Gallery box office at 503-472-2227, or check the website, gallerytheater.org.

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