By Starla Pointer • Staff Writer • 

Fair over, exhibitors say goodbye

Marcus Larson/News-Register
Sisters Trista and Harmony Hutchison scream with delight as they ride the mini roller coaster at the Yamhill County Fair.
Marcus Larson/News-Register
Sisters Trista and Harmony Hutchison scream with delight as they ride the mini roller coaster at the Yamhill County Fair.
Marcus Larson/News-Register
Madison Olds presents her goat, Charles, at the Yamhill County Fair market animal auction. She plans to use the proceeds to purchase another goat to keep her doeling, Daisy, company.
Marcus Larson/News-Register
Madison Olds presents her goat, Charles, at the Yamhill County Fair market animal auction. She plans to use the proceeds to purchase another goat to keep her doeling, Daisy, company.
Marcus Larson/News-Register
While Oliver Smith works on his cow Manney s fur coat, right, Owen Amerson uses a air blower of dry off his cow Buckshot.  Both boys were preparing for their turn in the show ring at the county fair.
Marcus Larson/News-Register
While Oliver Smith works on his cow Manney's fur coat, right, Owen Amerson uses a air blower of dry off his cow Buckshot. Both boys were preparing for their turn in the show ring at the county fair.

The fair closed Saturday following a concert by Quiet Riot and the locally organized demolition derby, one of the event's biggest draws. Sunday morning, exhibitors picked up their items and prize ribbons or loaded up their animals for the trip back home.

Many FFA and 4-H members said goodbye to their market steers and swine on Saturday following another big draw, the annual animal auction. Madison Olds was among them, selling her market goat, Charles.

Charles weighed 65 pounds when she started working with him in the spring. He was up to 98 when he arrived for weigh-in at the fair.

The goal of market animals is to add weight to them so they'll sell well at auction, said Madison, a high school junior.

"You have to make sure they're eating a good amount and have lots of fresh water all the time," she said. "That's the most important thing."

Madison showed sheep as a child. This year, she joined a 4-H club so she could raise goats instead.

"I wanted to work with animals again and meet new people," she said, adding that she has accomplished both goals.

At the fair, she also showed a doeling. She named the young female goat Daisy, after her favorite flower.

Daisy placed second in one round of showing, fourth in another.

"The more you work with them, the better they'll show," Madison said. "I work very hard. It's an every day thing."

She's keeping the female for breeding. She plans to use her auction proceeds to buy another doeling so Daisy won't get lonely.

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